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Continued Challenges Accessing Pediatric Hospice Services

      Access to pediatric specialized care remains challenging in the United States (U.S.), with millions of children and families traveling 1.5 hours or more for specialty care.
      • Turner A
      • Ricketts T
      • Leslie LK.
      Comparison of number and geographic distribution of pediatric subspecialists and patient proximity to specialized care in the US between 2003 and 2019.
      These access deficits also impact end-of-life care for children with serious illness and their families. Approximately 55,000 children die annually in the U.S., and historically, hospice services reach only about 10% of dying children in the U.S., most of whom receive care through adult agencies.
      • Laird J
      • Cozad MJ
      • Keim-Malpass J
      • Mack JW
      • Lindley LC.
      Variation in state medicaid implementation of the ACA: the case of concurrent care for children.
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