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US Immigrant Utilization and Perceptions of Palliative Care

      Key Point
      • Negative perceptions about palliative care (e.g., death or dying associated with palliative care) are more prevalent among US immigrants than US-born individuals.
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      References

      1. Budiman A, Tamir, C., Mora, L., & Noe-Bustamante, L. Facts on U.S. Immigrants, 2018. 2020. Accessed February 4, 2022. https://www.pewresearch.org/hispanic/2020/08/20/facts-on-u-s-immigrants/

      2. Cohn DV. Future immigration will change the face of America by 2065. 2015. October 5, 2015. Accessed February 4, 2022. https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/10/05/future-immigration-will-change-the-face-of-america-by-2065/

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